Saturday, March 17, 2012

Woven and whipped wheel tutorial

The TAST stitch for week 11 is whipped wheel. I repeated a woven and whipped wheel I stitched on a crazy ornament a few years ago. It was a present for a quilting friend, so I only had a photo to see how I did it. I couldn’t find my notes 
(I had no journal at the time), but when I started stitching I remembered how 
I stitched it. First I drew 3 circles with a water soluble pen on my rust dyed fabric. The sizes are 3, 2 and 1 cm.
This template made it very easy.
I used a DMC broder special for my wheel. First I made 8 spokes from the outmost circle to the centre. Then 8 spokes between them from the outmost circle to the 1 cm circle. And finally 16 spokes between those from the outmost circle to the 2 cm circle.
I started with a whipped wheel. When the first circle was filled with whipped stitches I switched to woven stitches. If you’re not familiar with the woven wheel, you can find a tutorial in Sharon’s stitch dictionary. Start weaving under the new spokes to keep the stitches in place.
I know they always say you need an odd number of spokes with a woven wheel, but with a simple trick you can use an even number. After completing every round, just go under 2 spokes instead of 1 and continue weaving the normal way. This shifts one spoke every round and is not visible when the wheel is finished.
After a few rounds I switched to whipped spokes again until I finished the second circle.
Then I made a few rounds of woven stitches and finished it with whipped stitches.
I hope to share a photo of my sampler tomorrow, it’s still wet after removing the water soluble pen.

22 comments:

  1. Wow Annet this is fantastic --thanks for showing us how.

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  2. How wonderfully clever.... Thanks

    Arlene
    http://arlenes-crafts.blogspot.com.au/

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  3. woww Annet!!that is wonderful wheel you created..thanks for the tutorial too..

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  4. Wow....I will try this...thanks for ahring

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  5. This tutorial is very helpful. Thanks.

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  6. Beautiful!! Thanks for the tutorial.

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  7. That's gorgeous, thanka for the tutorial :)

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  8. Thank you Annet for a great tutorial on this.

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  9. This is wonderfully stitched Annet!! Thanks for sharing how you made it as I definitely want to try it.

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  10. Fabulous interpretation of this stitch! Thank you for sharing this wonderful tutorial. My own wheels look awkward; I worked them on evenweave and think I could better do them on hooped cloth. Your method of using spikes of varying lengths I would think help keeping tensions and bunching under control. That template is to die for! I must find one.

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  11. Annet thank you so much for this tutorial! It looks wonderful and I'm goign to give it a try!

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  12. Thanks a lot for the tutorial.

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  13. I love how this looks. I think of a basket when you use these colors. Really wonderful!

    Where did you find this tool? This is really something I could use!

    ~Faith
    Airy Nothing

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    1. Thanks Faith. I bought my template in a Dutch shop called So Low. I think you can find a similar tool at a store were they sell school supplies. It's normally used for mathematics.

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  14. Thanks for this wonderful tutorial.

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  15. would have loved to see how you started in the center, not sure how to do that. love it at the end.

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    1. Thanks, RoseMary. I just started the same way as Sharon showed in her tutorial. You find the link to her tutorial in the first line of my text.

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